Tuesday, February 26, 2013

{Vintage Kitchen} Sausage Cobbler (1947)

It seems like most of my Vintage Kitchen recipes so far have been from 1947 - I'm not sure particularly why, since I've consulted my entire collection of magazines for recipes.


This week I served up "sausage cobbler", which is in fact actually Toad in the Hole by a slightly more country-cottage-chic name.


I made it exactly as directed, using spicy beef sausages from the local butcher instead of pork. And obviously not in a Yorkshire pudding tin. And do you know what? It was delicious. I'm actually slightly surprised how good all the recipes I've tried so far have turned out to be - most of them are great storecupboard stand-bys, and in fact I've already made the fishcakes again since (using smoked mackerel fillets - worked great). This recipe is another that's headed onto the to-make-again list - it's dead easy, requires almost no preparation and makes great winter comfort food - the only thing I'd do differently is to caramelise the onions a bit first to add a little more flavour.

12 comments:

  1. Hmm! Proof that a good recipe is always in fashion! Also, I have seen this kind of thing on 'gasto pub' menus for extortionate prices. How much better (and cheaper!) to make it at home yourself!

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  2. Maybe this is because I'm from the US, but what is "thin white sauce"? Is that something you can buy in a can in England, or is it just like a really thin roux that you make yourself?

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    1. Just a thin roux sauce made with corn flour and milk I think. We don't buy anything like that here in the UK as far as I know.

      I love toad in the hole. But I hate washing up the tin!!

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    2. White sauce is, I believe, the same as what you call a roux - butter and flour, then milk.

      xx Charlotte

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    3. I can confirm this- UK lass in USA :) Yes, a white sauce is a simple roux sauce.

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  3. I love that even your cooking is vintage =) this looks delicious! xx

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  4. Want to make it! But what is a "thin white sause" I am also from the US (New Orleans, Louisiana) and would like to make this 1947 dish.

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  5. Majorly yummy looking! Toad in the hole has always been one of my favourite British dishes. I've been trying for years to come up with a suitable GF and egg-free version (I can't eat either any more due to celiac disease and an egg allergy). I haven't quite hit on a recipe I adore yet, but it's an ongoing process (GF pancake batter mix as a base yielding promising results) and hopefully I'll come up with a pretty-close-to-the-original version that works for me one day.

    ♥ Jessica

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  6. You keep making me nostalgic for my childhood and the things my parents used to cook! Clearly children of post-war frugality and good, honest, basic food!

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  7. It has been ages since I made Toad in the Hole. I should get some turkey sausages and try it (we don't eat pork anymore).
    And for the record, white sauce is a simple roux, just add more milk to thin it/make it a thin white sauce :)
    (I'm bilingual in American English and the Queen's English, having lived here in the USA for 14 years now ;))

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  8. Unfortunately I was put off this as a child, someone who couldn't cook served it and it was so disgusting! Pallid, flabby and the sausages weren't browned, I can remember it yet and it wasn't good. I really should try it again, I like sausages and I like Yorkshire pudding, it's just the memory of that dreadful meal, the horror, scarred for life!! Yours certainly looks much more enticing.

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  9. I absolutely adore toad-in-the-hole! One of my favourite dinners of all time!

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